Doughnut Plant

Doughnuts

Mark Isreal started off in the ‘90s baking doughnuts at night in the Lower East Side, and then hopping on his bicycle in the morning to deliver them to various New York City cafés. As a result, Doughnut Plant was born and today, Doughnut Plant continues to delight with gooey, chewy and oversized delicacies featuring homemade jams and fillings. Handcrafted daily without eggs, preservatives, or anything artificial, Doughnut Plant is a destination for all New Yorkers.

Get to know: Doughnut Plant

Mark Isreal

Owner

In 1994, you began Doughnut Plant using your grandfather's recipe in the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building that had been converted into a bakery. For five years you made doughnuts all night long in that space, one of your four stores is on Grand Street, and now you will join The Market Line marketplace. In your longstanding relationship with the Lower East Side, what continues to be your favorite thing about the neighborhood?

History! I love the rich history of the neighborhood. It was always full of opportunity. When I moved to the neighborhood in 1982, it was cheap and full of opportunities. My rent was $375 and the landlord asked if that was too much. There was such a spirit of creativity and entrepreneurship and support.

In addition to the classic yeast, cake and filled doughnut offerings, you have created several vegan and savory varieties. What is the most challenging part of the doughnut making process for any given type?

I never use eggs as an ingredient so that creates an extra challenge when making doughnuts and fillings.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

The sense of neighborhood. Things change, people move, but I have long lasting friendships with people I met on Ludlow Street years ago. I still work with Mary Adams, who had a shop called The Dress on the corner of Ludlow and Stanton. She created all of the doughnut pillows on the wall of our Chelsea Hotel shop and the doughnut stools at our Queens shop.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best: Everything is possible. Worst: Everything is possible.

What is your earliest food memory?

The love I felt from my mom offering me food.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

Chocolate.

Preferred method of transportation:

Bike. When I first started Doughnut Plant, I delivered the doughnuts on my bike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

Devotion.

In 1994, you began Doughnut Plant using your grandfather's recipe in the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building that had been converted into a bakery. For five years you made doughnuts all night long in that space, one of your four stores is on Grand Street, and now you will join The Market Line marketplace. In your longstanding relationship with the Lower East Side, what continues to be your favorite thing about the neighborhood?

History! I love the rich history of the neighborhood. It was always full of opportunity. When I moved to the neighborhood in 1982, it was cheap and full of opportunities. My rent was $375 and the landlord asked if that was too much. There was such a spirit of creativity and entrepreneurship and support.

In addition to the classic yeast, cake and filled doughnut offerings, you have created several vegan and savory varieties. What is the most challenging part of the doughnut making process for any given type?

I never use eggs as an ingredient so that creates an extra challenge when making doughnuts and fillings.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

The sense of neighborhood. Things change, people move, but I have long lasting friendships with people I met on Ludlow Street years ago. I still work with Mary Adams, who had a shop called The Dress on the corner of Ludlow and Stanton. She created all of the doughnut pillows on the wall of our Chelsea Hotel shop and the doughnut stools at our Queens shop.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best: Everything is possible. Worst: Everything is possible.

What is your earliest food memory?

The love I felt from my mom offering me food.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

Chocolate.

Preferred method of transportation:

Bike. When I first started Doughnut Plant, I delivered the doughnuts on my bike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

Devotion.

In 1994, you began Doughnut Plant using your grandfather's recipe in the basement of a Lower East Side tenement building that had been converted into a bakery. For five years you made doughnuts all night long in that space, one of your four stores is on Grand Street, and now you will join The Market Line marketplace. In your longstanding relationship with the Lower East Side, what continues to be your favorite thing about the neighborhood?

History! I love the rich history of the neighborhood. It was always full of opportunity. When I moved to the neighborhood in 1982, it was cheap and full of opportunities. My rent was $375 and the landlord asked if that was too much. There was such a spirit of creativity and entrepreneurship and support.

In addition to the classic yeast, cake and filled doughnut offerings, you have created several vegan and savory varieties. What is the most challenging part of the doughnut making process for any given type?

I never use eggs as an ingredient so that creates an extra challenge when making doughnuts and fillings.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

The sense of neighborhood. Things change, people move, but I have long lasting friendships with people I met on Ludlow Street years ago. I still work with Mary Adams, who had a shop called The Dress on the corner of Ludlow and Stanton. She created all of the doughnut pillows on the wall of our Chelsea Hotel shop and the doughnut stools at our Queens shop.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best: Everything is possible. Worst: Everything is possible.

What is your earliest food memory?

The love I felt from my mom offering me food.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

Chocolate.

Preferred method of transportation:

Bike. When I first started Doughnut Plant, I delivered the doughnuts on my bike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

Devotion.