Grand Delancey

Craft Beer Bar

Neighborhood Restaurant Group will bring an unwavering commitment to procuring and purveying the best (and hardest-to-find) craft beers to New York’s LES with The Grand Delancey. Beer Director Greg Engert will rotate over 1,200 different beers through a state-of-the-art, 50 tap draft system each year, along with multiple cask ales and a focused reserve bottle offering. The beer program will serve to distill down the finest selections from a booming industry in an easy-to-navigate format for craft beer novices and avid consumers alike. At The Grand Delancey, you’ll be able to order food from all your favorite Market Line vendors while enjoying one of the 1,200 rotating beers.

Get to Know: Grand Delancey

Michael Babin & Greg Engert

Principal & Partner-Beer Director of Neighborhood Restaurant Group

Michael, you founded the Neighborhood Restaurant Group in 1997 with the goal of creating exceptional restaurants and food-related businesses that both reflect and enrich the communities in which they are located. In what ways has the Lower East Side and its community informed the plans and identity of your first New York venture, The Grand Delancey Beer Hall at The Market Line?

The neighborhood has informed every aspect of The Grand Delancey. We’ve been purposefully conservative with our expansion plans outside of DC, waiting to find an opportunity that would allow us to bring something new and special to a neighborhood that wants just that. With the Market Line, we truly believe the stars have aligned; the project is shaping up to be an iconic destination with an unparalleled line-up of vendors in a singular location. We’re coming into this with a tremendous amount of respect and gratitude, and our goal is to bring in beers that enhance the food of the market – and by extension, the neighborhood. We’re also looking forward to spotlighting the brewers in this city and the surrounding region.

Greg, as the beer director of Neighborhood Restaurant Group, the co-founder of Bluejacket Brewery in Washington, DC and a craft beer expert, how did you go about developing the beer program at The Grand Delancey and what are some of the standout beers patrons can expect to see on draft?

We really wanted to dive in and explore the dynamic NYC craft brewing scene with The Grand Delancey, and to showcase the finest local brewers in conversation with the most exciting US and international producers. Expect a wide array of brewing styles and flavors, with a mix of modern and classic offerings, all vying for your attention: hazy IPAs, fruited sours and pastry stouts served side-by-side with traditional Czech lagers, British real ales and Franconian Kellerbier. This panorama is a reflection of our new neighborhood and will provide a myriad pairing possibilities for the wide array of cuisines on hand at The Market Line.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

Cultural confluence. The unceasing interplay of flavors and ideas creates an energy that extends far beyond the borders of this neighborhood.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC?

The best thing is the verve and the hum of the city constantly moving and making. The worst? No matter what you are doing on any given night you always know you’re missing out on 12 other things because there’s so much going on.

What is your earliest food memory?

MB: My Sicilian grandma’s kitchen, and the aroma of her red sauce emanating from it. She’d spend her Fridays and Saturdays cooking so she could bring her amazing food to all the different households of the families around the city on Sunday.

GE: Family dinners at crowded, classic Italian spots in Schenectady, NY. I have loved the commotion and conviviality of those scenes, along with the effortless impact of those flavors, ever since.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

MB: There are a lot that I would really miss if I couldn’t get them, but I’d probably have to put gumbo at the top of the list, either seafood or chicken and andouille.

GE: I have countless favorites, but my recent obsession is Sichuan food. And while I love to explore menus and try new dishes, I mostly eat an obscene amount of Dan Dan Noodles and Mapo Tofu.

Preferred method of transportation:

MB: The car. We have 20 different properties throughout the DC area, so I use the time to take calls while en route to restaurants and meetings.

GE: While the car is the most necessary and useful, I wish I could walk everywhere.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

MB: Too many to choose just one! Take your pick of fundamentals like good olive oil, good butter, good salt.

GE: With the amount of red sauce my wife and I make at home, garlic is for sure our most essential ingredient.

Michael, you founded the Neighborhood Restaurant Group in 1997 with the goal of creating exceptional restaurants and food-related businesses that both reflect and enrich the communities in which they are located. In what ways has the Lower East Side and its community informed the plans and identity of your first New York venture, The Grand Delancey Beer Hall at The Market Line?

The neighborhood has informed every aspect of The Grand Delancey. We’ve been purposefully conservative with our expansion plans outside of DC, waiting to find an opportunity that would allow us to bring something new and special to a neighborhood that wants just that. With the Market Line, we truly believe the stars have aligned; the project is shaping up to be an iconic destination with an unparalleled line-up of vendors in a singular location. We’re coming into this with a tremendous amount of respect and gratitude, and our goal is to bring in beers that enhance the food of the market – and by extension, the neighborhood. We’re also looking forward to spotlighting the brewers in this city and the surrounding region.

Greg, as the beer director of Neighborhood Restaurant Group, the co-founder of Bluejacket Brewery in Washington, DC and a craft beer expert, how did you go about developing the beer program at The Grand Delancey and what are some of the standout beers patrons can expect to see on draft?

We really wanted to dive in and explore the dynamic NYC craft brewing scene with The Grand Delancey, and to showcase the finest local brewers in conversation with the most exciting US and international producers. Expect a wide array of brewing styles and flavors, with a mix of modern and classic offerings, all vying for your attention: hazy IPAs, fruited sours and pastry stouts served side-by-side with traditional Czech lagers, British real ales and Franconian Kellerbier. This panorama is a reflection of our new neighborhood and will provide a myriad pairing possibilities for the wide array of cuisines on hand at The Market Line.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

Cultural confluence. The unceasing interplay of flavors and ideas creates an energy that extends far beyond the borders of this neighborhood.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC?

The best thing is the verve and the hum of the city constantly moving and making. The worst? No matter what you are doing on any given night you always know you’re missing out on 12 other things because there’s so much going on.

What is your earliest food memory?

MB: My Sicilian grandma’s kitchen, and the aroma of her red sauce emanating from it. She’d spend her Fridays and Saturdays cooking so she could bring her amazing food to all the different households of the families around the city on Sunday.

GE: Family dinners at crowded, classic Italian spots in Schenectady, NY. I have loved the commotion and conviviality of those scenes, along with the effortless impact of those flavors, ever since.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

MB: There are a lot that I would really miss if I couldn’t get them, but I’d probably have to put gumbo at the top of the list, either seafood or chicken and andouille.

GE: I have countless favorites, but my recent obsession is Sichuan food. And while I love to explore menus and try new dishes, I mostly eat an obscene amount of Dan Dan Noodles and Mapo Tofu.

Preferred method of transportation:

MB: The car. We have 20 different properties throughout the DC area, so I use the time to take calls while en route to restaurants and meetings.

GE: While the car is the most necessary and useful, I wish I could walk everywhere.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

MB: Too many to choose just one! Take your pick of fundamentals like good olive oil, good butter, good salt.

GE: With the amount of red sauce my wife and I make at home, garlic is for sure our most essential ingredient.

Michael, you founded the Neighborhood Restaurant Group in 1997 with the goal of creating exceptional restaurants and food-related businesses that both reflect and enrich the communities in which they are located. In what ways has the Lower East Side and its community informed the plans and identity of your first New York venture, The Grand Delancey Beer Hall at The Market Line?

The neighborhood has informed every aspect of The Grand Delancey. We’ve been purposefully conservative with our expansion plans outside of DC, waiting to find an opportunity that would allow us to bring something new and special to a neighborhood that wants just that. With the Market Line, we truly believe the stars have aligned; the project is shaping up to be an iconic destination with an unparalleled line-up of vendors in a singular location. We’re coming into this with a tremendous amount of respect and gratitude, and our goal is to bring in beers that enhance the food of the market – and by extension, the neighborhood. We’re also looking forward to spotlighting the brewers in this city and the surrounding region.

Greg, as the beer director of Neighborhood Restaurant Group, the co-founder of Bluejacket Brewery in Washington, DC and a craft beer expert, how did you go about developing the beer program at The Grand Delancey and what are some of the standout beers patrons can expect to see on draft?

We really wanted to dive in and explore the dynamic NYC craft brewing scene with The Grand Delancey, and to showcase the finest local brewers in conversation with the most exciting US and international producers. Expect a wide array of brewing styles and flavors, with a mix of modern and classic offerings, all vying for your attention: hazy IPAs, fruited sours and pastry stouts served side-by-side with traditional Czech lagers, British real ales and Franconian Kellerbier. This panorama is a reflection of our new neighborhood and will provide a myriad pairing possibilities for the wide array of cuisines on hand at The Market Line.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of…

Cultural confluence. The unceasing interplay of flavors and ideas creates an energy that extends far beyond the borders of this neighborhood.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC?

The best thing is the verve and the hum of the city constantly moving and making. The worst? No matter what you are doing on any given night you always know you’re missing out on 12 other things because there’s so much going on.

What is your earliest food memory?

MB: My Sicilian grandma’s kitchen, and the aroma of her red sauce emanating from it. She’d spend her Fridays and Saturdays cooking so she could bring her amazing food to all the different households of the families around the city on Sunday.

GE: Family dinners at crowded, classic Italian spots in Schenectady, NY. I have loved the commotion and conviviality of those scenes, along with the effortless impact of those flavors, ever since.

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

MB: There are a lot that I would really miss if I couldn’t get them, but I’d probably have to put gumbo at the top of the list, either seafood or chicken and andouille.

GE: I have countless favorites, but my recent obsession is Sichuan food. And while I love to explore menus and try new dishes, I mostly eat an obscene amount of Dan Dan Noodles and Mapo Tofu.

Preferred method of transportation:

MB: The car. We have 20 different properties throughout the DC area, so I use the time to take calls while en route to restaurants and meetings.

GE: While the car is the most necessary and useful, I wish I could walk everywhere.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

MB: Too many to choose just one! Take your pick of fundamentals like good olive oil, good butter, good salt.

GE: With the amount of red sauce my wife and I make at home, garlic is for sure our most essential ingredient.