Nom Wah

Dim Sum

Originally a tea parlor and bakery founded in 1920 at 13-15 Doyers Street in what was then nicknamed the “Bloody Angle”, Nom Wah for its mooncakes. As time passed, Nom Wah expanded their repertoire with dim sum. Today, owner Wilson Tang synthesizes tradition with modernity, as its old roots bring old-timers and fresh faces to its doors. In The Market Line, Nom Wah will offer both full-menu counter-service and take-out selling many of the menu items found nearby in Chinatown, such as mooncakes, dumplings, rice rolls, and pork buns.

Get to know: Nom Wah

Wilson Tang

Owner

In the past few years you've opened several Nom Wah locations downtown each with different identities and menus from the original Nom Wah Tea Parlor. What will distinguish this Lower East Side Nom Wah location?

I think with the expansion, I learned about what works and what doesn't really. And sometimes it's all about not reinventing the wheel again and stick with the hits. I think The Market Line will see a lot of the things you see at the Tea Parlor as well as food items that works for us in the satellite stores.

You have said in the past that you were sheltered from the family business while growing up in Chinatown, what made you decide to take it over in 2010?

I always had a passion for hospitality. It is what my immigrant dad like most immigrants did when he first came to America (work in a restaurant). The decision in 2010 was just a perfect storm. My uncle Wally was finally retiring, I had these thoughts of dim sum all day and an opportunity to revive an 80-plus year-old restaurant.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of...

When I think of the LES, I think about how I've come full circle. I think about my days hanging out there as a teenager and young adult. I remember all the places that I went to eat and drink at. Some are still here and some are not. I think about how upset I was when I really saw it changing and how I really can't be that mad anymore because I am part of that change.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best thing about NYC is that you can get anything at anytime. The worst thing about NYC is also that you can get anything at anytime.

What is your earliest food memory?

My earliest and most memorable food memory has to be learning to cook for myself. What that basically meant was that I opened cans of Dinty Moore Beef Stew and poured it over some leftover take out rice and put it in the microwave with a wet paper towel. I grew up in a poor household and I remember in the winter we hardly turned on the heat. I loved seeing the congealed ring of fat around the can of beef stew and after I microwaved it, that congealed ring of fat melts onto the rice...so delicious!

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

One food that I cant live without is potato chips. It doesn't matter what flavor or what brand. I love the crunchy texture and how it makes a great snack and you can find it anywhere.

Preferred method of transportation:

Walk or citibike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

The most essential ingredient in my kitchen is the Chinese Trinity. Ginger, Scallions and Garlic.

In the past few years you've opened several Nom Wah locations downtown each with different identities and menus from the original Nom Wah Tea Parlor. What will distinguish this Lower East Side Nom Wah location?

I think with the expansion, I learned about what works and what doesn't really. And sometimes it's all about not reinventing the wheel again and stick with the hits. I think The Market Line will see a lot of the things you see at the Tea Parlor as well as food items that works for us in the satellite stores.

You have said in the past that you were sheltered from the family business while growing up in Chinatown, what made you decide to take it over in 2010?

I always had a passion for hospitality. It is what my immigrant dad like most immigrants did when he first came to America (work in a restaurant). The decision in 2010 was just a perfect storm. My uncle Wally was finally retiring, I had these thoughts of dim sum all day and an opportunity to revive an 80-plus year-old restaurant.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of...

When I think of the LES, I think about how I've come full circle. I think about my days hanging out there as a teenager and young adult. I remember all the places that I went to eat and drink at. Some are still here and some are not. I think about how upset I was when I really saw it changing and how I really can't be that mad anymore because I am part of that change.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best thing about NYC is that you can get anything at anytime. The worst thing about NYC is also that you can get anything at anytime.

What is your earliest food memory?

My earliest and most memorable food memory has to be learning to cook for myself. What that basically meant was that I opened cans of Dinty Moore Beef Stew and poured it over some leftover take out rice and put it in the microwave with a wet paper towel. I grew up in a poor household and I remember in the winter we hardly turned on the heat. I loved seeing the congealed ring of fat around the can of beef stew and after I microwaved it, that congealed ring of fat melts onto the rice...so delicious!

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

One food that I cant live without is potato chips. It doesn't matter what flavor or what brand. I love the crunchy texture and how it makes a great snack and you can find it anywhere.

Preferred method of transportation:

Walk or citibike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

The most essential ingredient in my kitchen is the Chinese Trinity. Ginger, Scallions and Garlic.

In the past few years you've opened several Nom Wah locations downtown each with different identities and menus from the original Nom Wah Tea Parlor. What will distinguish this Lower East Side Nom Wah location?

I think with the expansion, I learned about what works and what doesn't really. And sometimes it's all about not reinventing the wheel again and stick with the hits. I think The Market Line will see a lot of the things you see at the Tea Parlor as well as food items that works for us in the satellite stores.

You have said in the past that you were sheltered from the family business while growing up in Chinatown, what made you decide to take it over in 2010?

I always had a passion for hospitality. It is what my immigrant dad like most immigrants did when he first came to America (work in a restaurant). The decision in 2010 was just a perfect storm. My uncle Wally was finally retiring, I had these thoughts of dim sum all day and an opportunity to revive an 80-plus year-old restaurant.

When I think of the Lower East Side, I think of...

When I think of the LES, I think about how I've come full circle. I think about my days hanging out there as a teenager and young adult. I remember all the places that I went to eat and drink at. Some are still here and some are not. I think about how upset I was when I really saw it changing and how I really can't be that mad anymore because I am part of that change.

Best thing about NYC and worst thing about NYC:

Best thing about NYC is that you can get anything at anytime. The worst thing about NYC is also that you can get anything at anytime.

What is your earliest food memory?

My earliest and most memorable food memory has to be learning to cook for myself. What that basically meant was that I opened cans of Dinty Moore Beef Stew and poured it over some leftover take out rice and put it in the microwave with a wet paper towel. I grew up in a poor household and I remember in the winter we hardly turned on the heat. I loved seeing the congealed ring of fat around the can of beef stew and after I microwaved it, that congealed ring of fat melts onto the rice...so delicious!

What’s the one food you can’t live without?

One food that I cant live without is potato chips. It doesn't matter what flavor or what brand. I love the crunchy texture and how it makes a great snack and you can find it anywhere.

Preferred method of transportation:

Walk or citibike.

What is your most essential ingredient in the kitchen?

The most essential ingredient in my kitchen is the Chinese Trinity. Ginger, Scallions and Garlic.